Related News

NASA has recently launched a multi billion dollar mission to study planets magnetic Fields.

 

NASA has launched four identical spacecraft on a billion-dollar mission to study the explosive give-and-take of the Earth and sun’s magnetic fields.

 

The unmanned Atlas rocket, and NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, soared into a clear late-night sky, right on time. Within two hours, all four observatories were flying free.

 

“Just picture-perfect,” launch manager Omar Baez said early Friday. “Everybody’s cheering... Can’t ask for any more.”

The quartet of observatories is being placed into an oblong orbit stretching tens of thousands of miles into the magnetosphere, nearly halfway to the moon at one point.They will fly in pyramid formation, between 6 miles (10 kilometres) and 250 miles (402 kilometres) apart, to provide 3-D views of magnetic reconnection on the smallest of scales. Magnetic reconnection is what happens when magnetic fields like those around Earth and the sun come together, break apart, then come together again, releasing vast energy.

 

Data from this two-year mission should help scientists better understand so-called space weather.

Each observatory resembles a giant octagonal wheel, stretching more than 11 feet (3.35 meters) across and 4 feet (1.22 meters) high, and weighing 3,000 pounds (1,360.79 kilogrammes) apiece. Numbered and stacked like tires on top of the rocket for launch, No 4 popped free first more than an hour after liftoff, followed every five minutes by another.

 

“They’re all healthy and turned on. Essentially, we’re all green and headed into our mission,” said NASA project manager Craig Tooley. Once the long, sensor-laden booms are extended in a few days, each spacecraft could span a baseball field.

Principal investigator Jim Burch from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio said measurements will be made down to the electron scale, significantly smaller than previous heliophysics missions.

 

In all, there are 100 science sensors. Primary science-gathering will begin this summer, following a five-month checkout.

Radiation issues for manned Mars mission

sidebar radiation article

During the rover's cruise to Mars between December 2011 and July 2012, RAD showed that an astronaut would clock up the same radiation dose in a day that the average American receives in a year. If you exclude medical dosages, it would be 10 times more than the average American.

See original article from The Guardian here.

Materials that Halt Hazardous Space Radiation

Radiation has long been an issue when it comes to space travel. In fact, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity recently confirmed previous research on the hazards of space radiation, revealing that radiation levels on the way to the Red Planet are several hundred times higher than the those humans receive on Earth. Now, scientists may have found a way to shield astronauts from the hazards of this radiation.

See original article from Science World Report here.

Upcoming Events

Last month October 2017 Next Month
M T W T F S S
week 39 1
week 40 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
week 41 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
week 42 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
week 43 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
week 44 30 31

Current Project Status

The SR2S project is nearing completion. Project partners presented their technological achievements at the final project dissemination event in Brussels in December 2015. To read more about this event, click here.

Next Project Milestone

The final project review meeting will take place in January 2016. Further information and final project results will be available after this date.

Got a question?

If you have a questions about the SR2S project, why not send us an email and we'll try to reply to your query as soon as possible. You can email us at questions@sr2s.eu

Latest Tweets

SR2SMars RT @esa: What is the EDRS #spacedatahighway and how will it work? https://t.co/VeHt1MlCtO Watch Launch 29 Jan https://t.co/NuFDE1bCRE